Punjab: Skeletons Of 282 Indian Soldiers Killed In 1857 Revolt Found During Excavation

New Delhi: The Anthropology Department of Panjab University has found the skeletons of 282 Indian soldiers who participated in the country’s first war of independence in 1857. Dr. JS Sehrawat, Assistant Professor of the Department said that the skeletons of 282 Indian soldiers who participated in the country’s first freedom struggle in 1857 have been found during an excavation near Amritsar. These soldiers are said to have revolted against the use of cartridges made from pork and beef.

“These skeletons belong to 282 Indian soldiers killed during India’s first freedom struggle against the British in 1857. These were excavated from a well found underneath a religious structure in Ajnala near Amritsar in Punjab,” said the assistant professor.

“These soldiers were revolting against the use of pork and beef greased cartridges, a study has suggested. Coins, medals, DNA study, elemental analysis, anthropological, radio-carbon dating, all point towards the same,” Mr Sehrawat added.

ALSO READ: Traveling By Train? Know Latest Covid-19 SOP Issued By Railway For Passengers

Significantly, some historians consider the revolt of 1857 as the first freedom struggle of the country. Some Indian soldiers who had joined the British Indian Army were said to have revolted against the use of cartridges made of pork and beef, citing religious beliefs. 

This struggle of freedom was led by Mangal Pandey. He started the rebellion in Barrackpore near Calcutta. On March 21, 1857, the parade of the soldiers of the 34th Bengal Native Infantry was going on in Barrackpore, when Mangal Pandey blew the trumpet of rebellion against the British government. Mangal Pandey challenged his comrades in Barrackpore to protest and fired at the British officers coming towards him on horseback, according to the historians.

Advertisement
Web Hyip
Previous articleIndia-UK FTA draft treaty advanced in majority of chapters
Next articleLong After They Drove Away, Canada’s Truck Blockades Have a Political Champion